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Mankell Henning download all books 12 books

Herbert Molin, a retired police officer, lives alone in a remote cottage in northern Sweden. Two things seem to consume him; his passion for the tango, and an obsession with the “demons” he believes to be pursuing him. Early one morning shots shatter Molin’s window... by the time his body is found it is almost unrecognisable. Stefan Lindman is another off-the-job police officer. On extended sick leave due to having cancer of the tongue Lindman hears about the murder of his former colleague and, in a bid to take his mind off his own problems, decides to investigate. As his investigation becomes increasingly complex it is with both horror and disbelief that Lindman uncovers links to a global web of neo-Nazi activity.

On a winter day in 2008, Håkan von Enke, a retired high-ranking naval officer, vanishes during his daily walk in a forest near Stockholm. The investigation into his disappearance falls under the jurisdiction of the Stockholm police. It has nothing to do with Wallander — officially. But von Enke is his daughter’s future father-in-law. And so, with his inimitable disregard for normal procedure, Wallander is soon interfering in matters that are not his responsibility, making promises he won’t keep, telling lies when it suits him — and getting results. But the results hint at elaborate Cold War espionage activities that seem inextricably confounding, even to Wallander, who, in any case, is troubled in more personal ways as well. Negligent of his health, he’s become convinced that, having turned sixty, he is on the threshold of senility. Desperate to live up to the hope that a new granddaughter represents, he is continually haunted by his past. And looking toward the future with profound uncertainty, he will have no choice but to come face-to-face with his most intractable adversary: himself.

Early one morning, a small-town farmer discovers that his neighbors have been victims of a brutal attack during the night. An old man has been bludgeoned to death, and his tortured wife lies dying before the farmer’s eyes. The only clue is the single word she utters before she dies: “foreign.” In charge of the investigation is Inspector Kurt Wallander, a local cop whose personal life is in a shambles. His family is falling apart, he’s gaining weight, and he’s drinking too much, but he is tenacious and levelheaded in his sleuthing. he and his colleagues must contend with a wave of violent xenophobia as they search for the killers. Still, things get complicated when he has to deal with an eruption of violent antiforeigner sentiment, as well as a tough-minded — and very attractive — female district attorney, as he searches for the killers.

After nearly thirty years in the same job, Inspector Kurt Wallander is tired, restless, and itching to make a change. He is taken with a certain old farmhouse, perfectly situated in a quiet countryside with a charming, overgrown garden. There he finds the skeletal hand of a corpse in a shallow grave. Wallander’s investigation takes him deep into the history of the house and the land, until finally the shocking truth about a long-buried secret is brought to light.

Second in the Kurt Wallander series.On the Swedish coastline, two bodies, victims of grisly torture and cold execution, are discovered in a life raft. With no witnesses, no motives, and no crime scene, Detective Kurt Wallander is frustrated and uncertain he has the ability to solve a case as mysterious as it is heinous. But after the victims are traced to the Baltic state of Latvia, a country gripped by the upheaval of Soviet disintegration, Major Liepa of the Riga police takes over the investigation. Thinking his work done, Wallander slips into routine once more, until suddenly, he is called to Riga and plunged into an alien world where shadows are everywhere, everything is watched, and old regimes will do anything to stay alive.

Genre: Non-fiction

A non fiction book

A powerful, moving and tragic account of the families shattered and children orphaned as a result of the spread of HIV and, through the Memory Books project, a hope for the future.

Henning Mankell is best known for his highly successful crime novels, but few people are aware of his work with Aids charities in Africa and how he actively promotes and encourages the writing of memory books throughout the country. Memory Books is a project through which the HIV-infected parents of today are encouraged to write portraits of their lives and testaments of their love for their orphans of tomorrow. Through a combination of words and drawings they can leave a legacy, a hope that future generations may not suffer the same heartbreaking fate.

In I Die, but the Memory Lives on, this master storyteller has written a fable to illustrate the importance of books as a means of education, of preserving memories and of sharing life. In a very personal account he tells of his own fears and anxieties for the sufferers of HIV and Aids and, drawing on his experiences in many parts of Africa, proposes a way to help. This fable, The Mango Plant, comprises most of the book and is followed by factual afterwords from Dr Rachel Baggaley (Head of the Christian Aid HIV Unit) and Anders Wijkman (Member of the European Parliament, formerly Assistant Secretary General of the UN, and board member of Plan Sweden), and ends with a template for a memory book as an appendix.

The problem of Aids has been kept largely under control in Europe and is not therefore an issue at the forefront of our minds, but in the Third World it is a very different story. Lack of education about the disease and lack of money to buy life-prolonging drugs for existing sufferers have turned the problem into a plague of biblical proportions. 30 million people are HIV positive in Africa, almost 39 percent of the adult population in countries such as Botswana. In Zimbabwe life expectancy has now sunk to below 40 years of age, by 2010 it is predicted to fall to 30 years. As thousands die in their prime, there begins a shortage of teachers, labourers, and essential personnel that enable a country to run efficiently, not to mention the 14 million children that have been orphaned by HIV/Aids since the 1980s. These children are taken out of school in order to care for the sick and elderly. A lack of education and continued poverty perpetuates the problem.

Because levels of literacy are so low, the memory books also contain photographs (Mankell campaigns for cheap disposable cameras) and anything else that will evoke a memory, whether it be a drawing, a crushed flower or a lock of hair, anything that the orphan will relate to and inspire them to try the best they can to create a future.

Henning Mankell was first introduced to the Memory Book Project by Plan, a child-focused international development organisation, who had established the scheme in Uganda. UNAIDS estimate 1 million people in Uganda are infected with the disease and 200,000 have died from Aids-related illnesses. Since the outbreak in 1978, it is estimated 1.2 million children have been orphaned in Uganda alone. Plan Uganda encourages parents with the disease to create a memory book about their family history, matters of death, separation and sexuality for the child or children they will leave behind.

There are numerous worldwide charities and organisations working to fight the spread of HIV/Aids – further information and contact details can be found at the end of I Die, but the Memory Lives on.

Henning Mankell has kindly agreed to donate the royalties from I Die, but the Memory Lives on to an Aids charity of his choice.

The publication of I Die, but the Memory Lives on will raise awareness of this international problem, which, though it may not always be on the front pages of our newspapers, must always be on our minds until something has truly changed for the better.

"Nelio is dead. And however unlikely it may sound, it seemed to me that he died without once being afraid. How can that be possible?"-from Chronicler of the Winds

World famous for his Kurt Wallander mysteries, Henning Mankell has been published in thirty-five countries, with more than 25 million copies of his books in print. In Chronicler of the Winds, he gives us something different: a beautifully crafted novel that is a testament to the power of storytelling itself. On the rooftop of a theater in an African port, a ten-year-old boy lies slowly dying of bullet wounds. He is Nelio, a leader of street kids, rumored to be a healer and a prophet, and possessed of a strangely ancient wisdom.

One of the millions of poor people "forced to eat life raw," Nelio tells his unforgettable story over the course of nine nights. After bandits cruelly raze his village, he joins the legions of abandoned children living in the city's streets. An act of the imagination, an effort to prove to his comrades that life must be more than mere survival, cuts short Nelio's life.

Already published in thirteen countries, Chronicler of the Winds was short-listed for the Nordic Council Prize for Literature and was nominated for the Swedish Publishers Association's August Prize.

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