All books from genre Computers and Internet
Back

Computers and Internet 54 book

The agile model of software development has taken the world by storm. Now, in Agile Software Development, Second Edition, one of agile’s leading pioneers updates his Jolt Productivity award-winning book to reflect all that’s been learned about agile development since its original introduction.

Alistair Cockburn begins by updating his powerful model of software development as a “cooperative game of invention and communication.” Among the new ideas he introduces: harnessing competition without damaging collaboration; learning lessons from lean manufacturing; and balancing strategies for communication. Cockburn also explains how the cooperative game is played in business and on engineering projects, not just software development

Next, he systematically illuminates the agile model, shows how it has evolved, and answers the questions developers and project managers ask most often, including

· Where does agile development fit in our organization?

· How do we blend agile ideas with other ideas?

· How do we extend agile ideas more broadly?

Cockburn takes on crucial misconceptions that cause agile projects to fail. For example, you’ll learn why encoding project management strategies into fixed processes can lead to ineffective strategy decisions and costly mistakes. You’ll also find a thoughtful discussion of the controversial relationship between agile methods and user experience design.

Cockburn turns to the practical challenges of constructing agile methodologies for your own teams. You’ll learn how to tune and continuously reinvent your methodologies, and how to manage incomplete communication. This edition contains important new contributions on these and other topics:

· Agile and CMMI

· Introducing agile from the top down

· Revisiting “custom contracts”

· Creating change with “stickers”

In addition, Cockburn updates his discussion of the Crystal methodologies, which utilize his “cooperative game” as their central metaphor.

If you’re new to agile development, this book will help you succeed the first time out. If you’ve used agile methods before, Cockburn’s techniques will make you even more effective.

Comprehensive Real-World Guidance for Every Embedded Developer and Engineer

This book brings together indispensable knowledge for building efficient, high-value, Linux-based embedded products: information that has never been assembled in one place before. Drawing on years of experience as an embedded Linux consultant and field application engineer, Christopher Hallinan offers solutions for the specific technical issues you're most likely to face, demonstrates how to build an effective embedded Linux environment, and shows how to use it as productively as possible.

Hallinan begins by touring a typical Linux-based embedded system, introducing key concepts and components, and calling attention to differences between Linux and traditional embedded environments. Writing from the embedded developer's viewpoint, he thoroughly addresses issues ranging from kernel building and initialization to bootloaders, device drivers to file systems.

Hallinan thoroughly covers the increasingly popular BusyBox utilities; presents a step-by-step walkthrough of porting Linux to custom boards; and introduces real-time configuration via CONFIG_RT--one of today's most exciting developments in embedded Linux. You'll find especially detailed coverage of using development tools to analyze and debug embedded systems--including the art of kernel debugging.

• Compare leading embedded Linux processors

• Understand the details of the Linux kernel initialization process

• Learn about the special role of bootloaders in embedded Linux systems, with specific emphasis on U-Boot

• Use embedded Linux file systems, including JFFS2--with detailed guidelines for building Flash-resident file system images

• Understand the Memory Technology Devices subsystem for flash (and other) memory devices

• Master gdb, KGDB, and hardware JTAG debugging

• Learn many tips and techniques for debugging within the Linux kernel

• Maximize your productivity in cross-development environments

• Prepare your entire development environment, including TFTP, DHCP, and NFS target servers

• Configure, build, and initialize BusyBox to support your unique requirements

This book was written to provide a single reference for network administration in a Linux environment. Beginners and experienced users alike should find the information they need to cover nearly all important administration activities required to manage a Linux network configuration. The possible range of topics to cover is nearly limitless, so of course it has been impossible to include everything there is to say on all subjects. We've tried to cover the most important and common ones. We've found that beginners to Linux networking, even those with no prior exposure to Unix-like operating systems, have found this book good enough to help them successfully get their Linux network configurations up and running and get them ready to learn more.

There are many books and other sources of information from which you can learn any of the topics covered in this book (with the possible exception of some of the truly Linux-specific features, such as the new Linux firewall interface, which is not well documented elsewhere) in greater depth. We've provided a bibliography for you to use when you are ready to explore more.

"Neither a "Starting Linux" book nor a dry reference manual, this book has a lot to offer to those coming to Fedora from other operating systems or distros." -- Behdad Esfahbod, Fedora developer

This book will get you up to speed quickly on Fedora Linux, a securely-designed Linux distribution that includes a massive selection of free software packages. Fedora is hardened out-of-the-box, it's easy to install, and extensively customizable - and this book shows you how to make Fedora work for you.

Fedora Linux: A Complete Guide to Red Hat's Community Distribution

In this book, you'll learn how to:

 Install Fedora and perform basic administrative tasks

 Configure the KDE and GNOME desktops

 Get power management working on your notebook computer and hop on a wired or wireless network

 Find, install, and update any of the thousands of packages available for Fedora

 Perform backups, increase reliability with RAID, and manage your disks with logical volumes

 Set up a server with file sharing, DNS, DHCP, email, a Web server, and more

 Work with Fedora's security features including SELinux, PAM, and Access Control Lists (ACLs)

Whether you are running the stable version of Fedora Core or bleeding-edge Rawhide releases, this book has something for every level of user. The modular, lab-based approach not only shows you how things work - but also explains why--and provides you with the answers you need to get up and running with Fedora Linux.

Master the fundamental concepts of real-time embedded system programming and jumpstart your embedded projects with effective design and implementation practices. This book bridges the gap between higher abstract modeling concepts and the lower-level programming aspects of embedded systems development. You gain a solid understanding of real-time embedded systems with detailed practical examples and industry wisdom on key concepts, design processes, and the available tools and methods.

Delve into the details of real-time programming so you can develop a working knowledge of the common design patterns and program structures of real-time operating systems (RTOS). The objects and services that are a part of most RTOS kernels are described and real-time system design is explored in detail. You learn how to decompose an application into units and how to combine these units with other objects and services to create standard building blocks. A rich set of ready-to-use, embedded design “building blocks” is also supplied to accelerate your development efforts and increase your productivity.

Experienced developers new to embedded systems and engineering or computer science students will both appreciate the careful balance between theory, illustrations, and practical discussions. Hard-won insights and experiences shed new light on application development, common design problems, and solutions in the embedded space. Technical managers active in software design reviews of real-time embedded systems will find this a valuable reference to the design and implementation phases.

Qing Li is a senior architect at Wind River Systems, Inc., and the lead architect of the company’s embedded IPv6 products. Qing holds four patents pending in the embedded kernel and networking protocol design areas. His 12+ years in engineering include expertise as a principal engineer designing and developing protocol stacks and embedded applications for the telecommunications and networks arena. Qing was one of a four-member Silicon Valley startup that designed and developed proprietary algorithms and applications for embedded biometric devices in the security industry.

Caroline Yao has more than 15 years of high tech experience ranging from development, project and product management, product marketing, business development, and strategic alliances. She is co-inventor of a pending patent and recently served as the director of partner solutions for Wind River Systems, Inc.

At first glance, it may seem like I’m reinventing the wheel; Windows already comes with a very complex, very functional GUI. Unfortunately, while the Windows GUI is great for office apps, quite frequently, it’s not suited for many games. Games tend to want a more precise control over the GUI than Windows can provide (for example, games may want to use alpha-blending to implement partially transparent windows - easy if you’ve written your own GUI, but next to impossible using the Windows GUI).

This article will walk you though how to create a GUI using C++ and DirectX. The series is divided into several parts, each dealing with a specific aspect of GUI programming:

Part I: The Basics, and the Mouse

Part II: Windows

Part III: Controls

Part IV: Resource Editors and Other Madness

NOTE: This document was originally four separate articles on www.gamedev.net. I’ve concatenated all four into one for the XGDC, but they remain otherwise unchanged. - Mason

Disclaimer: If you know anything beyond the word itself, you probably know more about matrices than I do. This discussion is a nonmathematical practical guide to using matrix math in OpenGL apps. The routines in the source code are for the most part drawn from standard textbooks or samples I found on the web. All I can say for the code is that it seems to work.

This book introduces embedded systems to C and C++ programmers. Topics include testing memory devices, writing and erasing Flash memory, verifying nonvolatile memory contents, controlling on-chip peripherals, device driver design and implementation, optimizing embedded code for size and speed, and making the most of C++ without a performance penalty.

Visit Software!

This tutorial attempts to get you started developing with the Win32 API as quickly and clearly as possible.

It's meant to be read as a whole

You may use this tutorial for absolutely no charge, however there are costs associated with hosting it on the web. If you found it to be of use to you and want to give something back, I would be grateful for donations of any amount to help pay for this website. This page gets approximately 11 thousand hits a month, and it adds up after a while :)

Enjoy the tutorial,

Brook

I would like to thank the following for the contributions they've made: Yih Horng, Todd Troxell, T Frank Zvovushe, Suzanne Lorrin, Seth McCarus, Crispina Chong, John Crutchfield, Scott Johnstone, Patrick Sears. As well as those who have simply written to say they've found the tutorial useful. It's much appreciated!

Welcome to Version 2.0 of theForger's Win32 API Tutorial

As distributed computer systems become more pervasive, so does the need for understanding how their operating systems are designed and implemented. Andrew S. Tanenbaum's Distributed Operating Systems fulfills this need. Representing a revised and greatly expanded Part II of the best-selling Modern Operating Systems, it covers the material from the original book, including communication, synchronization, processes, and file systems, and adds new material on distributed shared memory, real-time distributed systems, fault-tolerant distributed systems, and ATM networks. It also contains four detailed case studies: Amoeba, Mach, Chorus, and OSF/DCE. Tanenbaum's trademark writing provides readers with a thorough, concise treatment of distributed systems.