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Spy detective 248 book

He was a highly paid professional, killing anyone, anywhere, for a price. A murderer who relished his work, lovingly watching each victim writhe in blood. The Intelligence establishment named him The Vulture — “the scarlet vulture,” his mechanized talons dripping with human blood. Destroying The Vulture was Nick Carter’s next assignment. But before Carter could get to his lethal quarry, he had to hunt down another man. A bizarre double of The Vulture, forced into becoming the assassin’s perfect weapon — and his next agonized victim!

James Bond, Ian Fleming’s master spy, has returned, and He’s better than ever. Miss Moneypenny thinks so, and so soon will Lavender Peacock, the beautiful ward of the Laird of Mulcaldy. Political restraints are squeezing the department — but M still turns to his top agent when the country needs a trouble shooter. And one of those moments has arrived with an ominous meeting between an international terrorist and the top nuclear physicist, Anton Murik, Laird of Mulcaldy. Only James Bond can challenge a dangerously deranged opponent bent on the destruction of the Western World in a nuclear holocaust…

John le Carré classic novels deftly navigate readers through the intricate shadow worlds of international espionage with unsurpassed skill and knowledge, and have earned him — and his hero, British Secret Service Agent George Smiley, who is introduced in this, his first novel — unprecedented worldwide acclaim.

 George Smiley had liked Samuel Fennan, and now Fennan was dead from an apparent suicide. But why? Fennan, a Foreign Office man, had been under investigation for alleged Communist Party activities, but Smiley had made it clear that the investigation — little more than a routine security check — was over and that the file on Fennan could be closed. The very next day, Fennan was found dead with a note by his body saying his career was finished and he couldn't go on. Smiley was puzzled...

The odd thing about Walter Schoen, German born but now running a butcher shop in Detroit, he's a dead ringer for Heinrich Himmler, head of the SS and the Gestapo. They even share the same birthday.

Honey Deal, Walter's American wife, doesn't know that Walter is a member of a spy ring that sends U.S. war production data to Germany and gives shelter to escaped German prisoners of war. But she's tired of telling him jokes he doesn't understand—it's time to get a divorce.

Along comes Carl Webster, the hot kid of the Marshals Service. He's looking for Jurgen Schrenk, a former Afrika Korps officer who escaped from a POW camp in Oklahoma. Carl's pretty sure Walter's involved with keeping Schrenk hidden, so Carl gets to know Honey, hoping she'll take him to Walter. Carl then meets Vera Mezwa, the nifty Ukrainian head of the spy ring who's better looking than Mata Hari, and her tricky lover Bohdan with the Buster Brown haircut and a sly way of killing.

Honey's a free spirit; she likes the hot kid marshal and doesn't much care that he's married. But all Carl wants is to get Jurgen Schrenk without getting shot. And then there's Otto—the Waffen-SS major who runs away with a nice Jewish girl. It's Elmore Leonard's world—gritty, funny, and full of surprises.

Nick Carter must obey the whims of a beautiful, sadistic enemy spy to stop the traitor who could blow the U.S. sky high!

The scene was Hong Kong. The mission was to find Professor Loo, whose scientific knowledge could give the Red Chinese protection against any nuclear attack.

The thirteenth unputdownable thriller in the million selling John Milton series When a Russian defector is assassinated in a sleepy English seaside town, Group Fifteen agents John Milton and Michael Pope find themselves in a rush to uncover the culprits and bring them to justice. Their investigation leads them to Moscow and a confrontation with Directorate S, the agency responsible for seeding Russian sleeper agents around the world. When lies and double crossing mean that no-one is what they seem, the two agents – alone and without backup – struggle to achieve their goals under the most dangerous of circumstances. Set one week before the opening of The Cleaner, this compulsive thriller turns back the clock to Milton as a barely functioning alcoholic, still tormented by the ghosts of the men and women he has killed in the service of his country. Milton must fight his own demons as well as the Russian assassin sent to eliminate him. Will he be able to complete his mission and escape with his life?

The third Matt Helm novel, an American agent colder, tougher and more cynical than Bond. IN this story he gets sucked into the violent world of crime and espionage trying to protect his ex-wife and fend off the neurotic urges of a gangsters daughter.

"The best spy novel I've ever read that wasn't written by John Le Carré." – Stephen King

Now faced with the end of his quiet, settled life, reluctant spy Milo Weaver has no choice but to turn back to his old job as a 'tourist.' Before he can get back to the CIA's dirty work, he has to prove his loyalty to his new bosses, who know little of Milo 's background and less about who is really pulling the strings in the government above the Department of Tourism – or in the outside world, which is beginning to believe the legend of its existence. Milo is suddenly in a dangerous position, between right and wrong, between powerful self-interested men, between patriots and traitors – especially as a man who has nothing left to lose.

Quiller is back-still working without gun, cover or contacts-behind the Iron Curtain, hiding in a city where there is no place to hide. Trusting in a woman who can't be trusted. Rescuing a man he would rather kill. Trying to save a world that is already heading over the brink.

Quiller is "the greatest survival expert among contemporary secret agents." (The New York Times)

Adam Hall is "skillful as ever at stretching suspense to the screaming point." (Publishers Weekly)

Summoned late at night to the Bureau, Quiller attends a secret conference with the foreign secretary and a surprise defector: the Chinese ambassador to Britain. Minutes later, shots ring out and the ambassador's body is flung out onto the sidewalk of a deserted London street, riddled with bullets.

Searching for clues, Quiller flies to Calcutta to meet Sojourner, a key ally in the plan to bring democracy to China. But Sojourner is killed…thus two men, both dedicated to bringing freedom to their country, are dead. No wonder Quiller is skeptical about his next mission: smuggle a Chinese dissident into Tibet.

"Tense, intelligent, harsh, surprising." (The New York Times)

Somebody wants to spoil German unification, kill it dead. Who can it be? Who can find out? Who better than Quiller!

On site Quiller moves fast…too fast. He finds the target but gets targeted himself. He needs all of his luck, cunning and skill or this could be his last case!

"Nobody writes bettes espionage than Adam Hall!" (The New York Times)

In Quiller's latest mission, operation Meridian takes him into the espionage trenches of the deadly post-Cold War era. From the chaos of Eastern Europe to the brutality of Siberia, Quiller's far-reaching assignment exposes the very real dangers of life even in the New World Order. A vivid account of the power game in a Russia torn by civil war, Quiller Meridian deftly mirrors the grim realities in the aftermath of the Cold War.

For the first time, Quiller, the seasoned shadow executive of the anonymous Bureau in London, takes on a mission kept secret even from the head of the Bureau himself. Its code name is Salamander, its theater of operations Cambodia, its target Pol Pot, the architect of the infamous Killing Fields. Even as he arrives in the steaming heat of Phnom Penh, Quiller knows that he can trust neither Flockhart, his control in London, nor Pringle, his director in the field. His only ally is Gabrielle Bouchard, a young Eurasian photojournalist, who is waging her private vendetta against the murderous guerrillas of the Khmer Rouge. Endangered at every turn by Flockhart's reticence and the treacherous jungle, Quiller undertakes a suicide mission in the hope of saving Phnom Penh from an eleventh-hour attack by the Khmer Rouge intended to reinstate its bloody rule in Cambodia.

A Yugoslavian plane crashes in the south of France; a fuel tanker explodes at Rome airport, a British diplomat is shot dead in Phnom Penh. In each case Quiller, Adam Hall's relentless British agent witnesses the violence as he pursues a fanatical terrorist group known as Kobra.

THE KOBRA MANIFESTO is the seventh of Adam Hall's highly acclaimed series of Quiller novels. This chilling novel has all the gloss, pace and tension of Ian Fleming, combined with a detailed knowledge of secret service procedures characteristic of John le Carre.

"Tense, intelligent, harsh and surprising." (The New York Times)

Quiller is in Hong Kong, where he thinks he's on vacation. But every alleyway leads dead to danger, and Quiller gets the message: he's never off duty.

The plot moves into a high gear. Quiller always enjoyed his rides, but this one is taxing. He finds a woman as faithless as she is beautiful; he fails to reform her, but enjoys the effort. He takes on villains one, two and three at a time and dispatches them on land with karate and in the South Seas with its aquatic equivalent.

"Breathless entertainment." (Associated Press)

In Peking ("Pekin" in British usage) the crowds gather for the funeral of the Chinese Premier. Quiller reports it: "The British delegates formed a short line along the side of the catafalque as their leader placed the Queen's wreath carefully against it; then suddenly the sky was filled with flowers and the bloodied body of the Secretary of State was hurled against me by the blast as the coffin exploded."

"Quiller takes over where Bond left off." (Bookseller)