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Genre: Non-fiction

Erin Hunter's #1 nationally bestselling Warriors series continues with the fourth book in the Power of Three series!

The fourth book in this third series, Warriors: Power of Three #4: Eclipse, brings more adventure, intrigue, and thrilling battles to the epic world of the warrior Clans.

As Jaypaw, Hollypaw, and Lionpaw struggle with the weight of their destinies, a mysterious warning shakes the Clans' faith in their ancestors. All four Clans are in danger—and the fate of the warrior code now rests in the paws of three apprentices.

Genre: Prose

When this true-crime story first appeared in 1980, it made the New York Times bestseller list within weeks. Two decades later, it's being rereleased in conjunction with a film version produced by DreamWorks. In the space of five years, Frank Abagnale passed $2.5 million in fraudulent checks in every state and 26 foreign countries. He did it by pioneering implausible and brazen scams, such as impersonating a Pan Am pilot (puddle jumping around the world in the cockpit, even taking over the controls). He also played the role of a pediatrician and faked his way into the position of temporary resident supervisor at a hospital in Georgia. Posing as a lawyer, he conned his way into a position in a state attorney general's office, and he taught a semester of college-level sociology with a purloined degree from Columbia University.

The kicker is, he was actually a teenage high school dropout. Now an authority on counterfeiting and secure documents, Abagnale tells of his years of impersonations, swindles, and felonies with humor and the kind of confidence that enabled him to pull off his poseur performances. "Modesty is not one of my virtues. At the time, virtue was not one of my virtues," he writes. In fact, he did it all for his overactive libido-he needed money and status to woo the girls. He also loved a challenge and the ego boost that came with playing important men. What's not disclosed in this highly engaging tale is that Abagnale was released from prison after five years on the condition that he help the government write fraud-prevention programs. So, if you're planning to pick up some tips from this highly detailed manifesto on paperhanging, be warned: this master has already foiled you. -Lesley Reed

***

"A book that captivates from first page to last." – West Coast Review of Books

"Whatever the reader may think of his crimes, the reader will wind up chortling with and cheering along the criminal." – Charlottesville Progress

"Zingingly told… richly detailed and winning as the devil." – Kirkus Reviews – Review

Genre: Non-fiction

Gerald Durrell was born in India in 1925. His family settled on Corfu when he was a boy and he spent his time studying its wildlife. He relates these experiences in the trilogy beginning with My Family and Other Animals, and continuing with Birds, Beasts and Relatives and The Garden of the Gods. He writes with wry humour and great perception about both the humans and the animals he meets.

On leaving Corfu, Durrell returned to England to work at Whipsnade Park as a student keeper. His adventures there are told with characteristic energy in Beasts in My Belfry. A few years later, he began organizing his own animal-collecting expeditions. The first, to the Cameroons, was followed by expeditions to Paraguay, Argentina and Sierra Leone. He recounts these experiences in a number of books including The Drunken Forest. He also visited many countries while shooting various television series.

In 1959 Durrell realized a lifelong dream when he set up the Jersey Zoological Park, followed a few years later by the Jersey Wildlife Preservation Trust, renamed the Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust in 1999.

Whether in a factual account of an expedition or a work of non-fiction, Durrell’s style is exuberant, passionate and acutely observed. Gerald Durrell died in 1995.

Genre: Non-fiction

The team behind the bestseller turns conventional biography on its head—and shakes out the good stuff.

Following their Herculean—or is it Sisyphean?—efforts to save the living from ignorance, the two wittiest Johns in the English language turn their attention to the dead.

As the authors themselves say, “The first thing that strikes you about the Dead is just how many of them there are.” Helpfully, Lloyd and Mitchinson have employed a simple—but ruthless—criterion for inclusion: the dead person has to be interesting.

Here, then, is a dictionary of the dead, an encyclopedia of the embalmed. Ludicrous in scope, whimsical in its arrangement, this wildly entertaining tome presents pithy and provocative biographies of the no-longer-living from the famous to the undeservedly and—until now—permanently obscure. Spades in hand, Lloyd and Mitchinson have dug up everything embarrassing, fascinating, and downright weird about their subjects’ lives and added their own uniquely irreverent observations.

Organized by capricious categories—such as dead people who died virgins, who kept pet monkeys, who lost limbs, whose corpses refused to stay put—the dearly departed, from the inventor of the stove to a cross-dressing, bear-baiting female gangster finally receive the epitaphs they truly deserve.

Discover:

• Why Freud had a lifelong fear of trains

• The one thing that really made Isaac Newton laugh

• How Catherine the Great really died (no horse was involved)

Much like the country doctor who cured smallpox (he’s in here), Lloyd and Mitchinson have the perfect antidote for anyone out there dying of boredom. —like life itself—is hilarious, tragic, bizarre, and amazing. You may never pass a graveyard again without chuckling.

Genre: Non-fiction

The outrageous exploits of one of this century’s greatest scientific minds and a legendary American original. In this phenomenal national bestseller, the Nobel Prize-winning physicist Richard P. Feynman recounts in his inimitable voice his adventures trading ideas on atomic physics with Einstein and Bohr and ideas on gambling with Nick the Greek, painting a naked female toreador, accompanying a ballet on his bongo drums and much else of an eyebrow-raising and hilarious nature. A New York Times bestseller; more than 500,000 copies sold.

Genre: Non-fiction

When the unconventional Durrell family can no longer endure the damp, gray English climate, they do what any sensible family would do: sell their house and relocate to the sunny Greek isle of Corfu. My Family and Other Animals was intended to embrace the natural history of the island but ended up as a delightful account of Durrell’s family’s experiences, from the many eccentric hangers-on to the ceaseless procession of puppies, toads, scorpions, geckoes, ladybugs, glowworms, octopuses, bats, and butterflies into their home.

Genre: Non-fiction

Rosy, the elephant bequeathed to young Adrian Rookwhistle by a reprobate relative, turns out to be a handful; not only because of her size but also because of her fondness for strong drink. To Adrian she represents the chance to get away from a city shop and a suburban lodging by exploiting her theatrical talent and experience. To Rosy their progress towards the gayer South Coast resorts offers undreamed-of opportunities for drink and destruction.

So the Monkspepper Hunt is driven to delirium and Lady Fenneltree’s stately home reduced to a shambles. In due course the constabulary catches up with the pair, whose ensuing trial is a triumph of the law and of Rosy’s enormous charm. The verdict is—but then the story has to be read to be believed, if then.

In spite of all this the author firmly maintains that his first novel is entirely credible, further that it is “an almost true story”!

Genre: Children

Fire alone can save our Clan...

For generations, four Clans of wild cats have shared the forest according to the laws laid down by the powerful ancestors. But the warrior code is threatened, and the ThunderClan cats are in grave danger. The sinister ShadowClan grows stronger every day. Noble warriors are dying - and some deaths are more mysterious than others.

In the midst of this turmoil appears an ordinary housecat named Rusty... Who may yet turn out to be the bravest warrior of them all.

Genre: Non-fiction

Thomas L. Friedman is not so much a futurist, which he is sometimes called, as a presentist. His aim in , as in his earlier, influential , is not to give you a speculative preview of the wonders that are sure to come in your lifetime, but rather to get you caught up on the wonders that are already here. The world isn't going to be flat, it flat, which gives Friedman's breathless narrative much of its urgency, and which also saves it from the Epcot-style polyester sheen that futurists—the optimistic ones at least—are inevitably prey to.

What Friedman means by "flat" is "connected": the lowering of trade and political barriers and the exponential technical advances of the digital revolution that have made it possible to do business, or almost anything else, instantaneously with billions of other people across the planet. This in itself should not be news to anyone. But the news that Friedman has to deliver is that just when we stopped paying attention to these developments—when the dot-com bust turned interest away from the business and technology pages and when 9/11 and the Iraq War turned all eyes toward the Middle East—is when they actually began to accelerate. Globalization 3.0, as he calls it, is driven not by major corporations or giant trade organizations like the World Bank, but by individuals: desktop freelancers and innovative startups all over the world (but especially in India and China) who can compete—and win—not just for low-wage manufacturing and information labor but, increasingly, for the highest-end research and design work as well. (He doesn't forget the "mutant supply chains" like Al-Qaeda that let the small act big in more destructive ways.)

Friedman has embraced this flat world in his own work, continuing to report on his story after his book's release and releasing an unprecedented hardcover update of the book a year later with 100 pages of revised and expanded material. What's changed in a year? Some of the sections that opened eyes in the first edition—on China and India, for example, and the global supply chain—are largely unaltered. Instead, Friedman has more to say about what he now calls "uploading," the direct-from-the-bottom creation of culture, knowledge, and innovation through blogging, podcasts, and open-source software. And in response to the pleas of many of his readers about how to survive the new flat world, he makes specific recommendations about the technical and creative training he thinks will be required to compete in the "New Middle" class. As before, Friedman tells his story with the catchy slogans and globe-hopping anecdotes that readers of his earlier books and his columns know well, and he holds to a stern sort of optimism. He wants to tell you how exciting this new world is, but he also wants you to know you're going to be trampled if you don't keep up with it. A year later, one can sense his rising impatience that our popular culture, and our political leaders, are not helping us keep pace.

—Tom Nissley

Genre: Non-fiction

"The computer world is like an intellectual Wild West, in which you can shoot anyone you wish with your ideas, if you're willing to risk the consequences. " —from , by Paul Graham We are living in the computer age, in a world increasingly designed and engineered by computer programmers and software designers, by people who call themselves hackers. Who are these people, what motivates them, and why should you care? Consider these facts: Everything around us is turning into computers. Your typewriter is gone, replaced by a computer. Your phone has turned into a computer. So has your camera. Soon your TV will. Your car was not only designed on computers, but has more processing power in it than a room-sized mainframe did in 1970. Letters, encyclopedias, newspapers, and even your local store are being replaced by the Internet. , by Paul Graham, explains this world and the motivations of the people who occupy it. In clear, thoughtful prose that draws on illuminating historical examples, Graham takes readers on an unflinching exploration into what he calls "an intellectual Wild West." The ideas discussed in this book will have a powerful and lasting impact on how we think, how we work, how we develop technology, and how we live. Topics include the importance of beauty in software design, how to make wealth, heresy and free speech, the programming language renaissance, the open-source movement, digital design, Internet startups, and more. And here's a taste of what you'll find in : "In most fields the great work is done early on. The paintings made between 1430 and 1500 are still unsurpassed. Shakespeare appeared just as professional theater was being born, and pushed the medium so far that every playwright since has had to live in his shadow. Albrecht Durer did the same thing with engraving, and Jane Austen with the novel. Over and over we see the same pattern. A new medium appears, and people are so excited about it that they explore most of its possibilities in the first couple generations. Hacking seems to be in this phase now. Painting was not, in Leonardo's time, as cool as his work helped make it. How cool hacking turns out to be will depend on what we can do with this new medium." Andy Hertzfeld, co-creator of the Macintosh computer, says about : "Paul Graham is a hacker, painter and a terrific writer. His lucid, humorous prose is brimming with contrarian insight and practical wisdom on writing great code at the intersection of art, science and commerce." Paul Graham, designer of the new Arc language, was the creator of Yahoo Store, the first web-based application. In addition to his PhD in Computer Science from Harvard, Graham also studied painting at the Rhode Island School of Design and the Accademia di Belle Arti in Florence.

Genre: Non-fiction

This book was first published in 1970 and was a call to take heed of the looming "Future Shock" or backlash of humanities biggest, unresolved dilemmas such as: the widening disparity between rich and poor, ie, the wealth of the world being monopolized by smaller and smaller percentage of the world human population, while the growing number of poor or outright poverty stricken are growing by leaps and bounds; burgeoning human population pressures with it's ever-increasing demands on limited resources; pollution of the food chains; technology with it's blessings and baggage of intrusive, dehumanizing side-effects; world health crisis, etc.

While humanity is currently preferring to live in a state of denial about the impending backlash of the mostly human-caused problems facing our present and immediate future, there is a growing accumulation of data never historically available to us before on how to deal with our problems. Will we put this knowledge to use in time?

So what exactly is "Future Shock"? Toffler explains: "We may define future shock as the distress, both physical and psychological, that arises from an overload of the human organism's physical adaptive systems and it's decision-making processes. Put more simply, future shock is the human response to over-stimulation". Overload breakdown! The socio-political, economic and environmental bills are coming due and they WILL be paid, shocking or not!

Toffler sees that our time consuming, stressed-out, hyper-industrial, compulsive consuming society is leaving parents no time for proper child rearing— as if they were qualified for the task in the first place. Un-guided, un-taught, un-disciplined children set themselves and society up for another of the many aspects of future shock with their aberrant behavior expanding as they get older.

"We don't let just anyone perform brain surgery or for that matter, sell stocks and bonds. Even the lowest ranking civil servant is required to pass tests proving competence. Yet we allow virtually anyone, almost without regard for mental or moral qualifications to try his or her hand at raising young human beings, so long as these humans are biological off-spring. Despite the increasing complexity of the task, parenthood remains the *greatest single preserve of the amateur*."

Toffler suggests that society should "professionalize" child rearing and parents should be educated by mandate of society. That along with every other level of society for a literate, more successful society. Guidelines for instituting "appropriate technology" vs. irresponsible, runaway technology are covered. "Utopian" models for society should always be considered as guidelines for future adjustments and upgrades to consider— and think-tanks for that very purpose should be established. This along with "sanctuaries for social imagination"— sounds like ancient Greece, eh?

Ten years after this book was published, Marilyn Ferguson came out with her block-buster book, "The Aquarian Conspiracy". She somewhat took-up where Toffler left off and created a blueprint of where we are and where we should be heading to stave-off the trauma of future shock. She expertly delineates the "Paradigm Shift" or changes needed in our collective thinking and proffers an abundance of guidelines and resources for that objective.

The following year (1981), Duane Elgin comes out with his "Voluntary Simplicity", more guidelines for transitioning to a more harmonious existence. Elgin follows this with another similar book to "Future Shock" and "The Aquarian Conspiracy" with "Awakening Earth" (1993), then followed by "Promise Ahead"— a continuation of the paradigm shift of collective consciousness needed for survival into the future.

To all of these fine books, one should add Theodore Roszak's "The Voice of the Earth" and we then have a small, but potent collection of some of the most instructive and helpful books ever published for the immediate betterment of our existence on Earth. Excellent "How-to" manuals on global change in human perception of reality.

Genre: Prose

In 1995, Jean-Dominique Bauby was the editor-in-chief of French , the father of two young children, a 44-year-old man known and loved for his wit, his style, and his impassioned approach to life. By the end of the year he was also the victim of a rare kind of stroke to the brainstem. After 20 days in a coma, Bauby awoke into a body which had all but stopped working: only his left eye functioned, allowing him to see and, by blinking it, to make clear that his mind was unimpaired. Almost miraculously, he was soon able to express himself in the richest detail: dictating a word at a time, blinking to select each letter as the alphabet was recited to him slowly, over and over again. In the same way, he was able eventually to compose this extraordinary book.

By turns wistful, mischievous, angry, and witty, Bauby bears witness to his determination to live as fully in his mind as he had been able to do in his body. He explains the joy, and deep sadness, of seeing his children and of hearing his aged father’s voice on the phone. In magical sequences, he imagines traveling to other places and times and of lying next to the woman he loves. Fed only intravenously, he imagines preparing and tasting the full flavor of delectable dishes. Again and again he returns to an “inexhaustible reservoir of sensations,” keeping in touch with himself and the life around him.

Jean-Dominique Bauby died two days after the French publication of .

This book is a lasting testament to his life.

Acclaim for Jean-Dominique Bauby’s “The Diving Bell and the Butterfly”

“The sentences soar, unburdened by self-pity or despair, and the progression of short, lyrical chapters begin to resemble the beating of wings.”

“An admirable testament to the unkillable self, to the spirit that insists on itself so vehemently that it ultimately transcends and escapes the prison of the body.”

— Francine Prose,

“The most remarkable memoir of our time—perhaps of any time.”

— Cynthia Ozick

“Shattering eloquence…. The real glory here is Bauby himself, whose spirit asserts itself again and again in the words that survive him.”

“To read this most extraordinary of narratives is to discover the luminosity within a courageous man's mind…. Incomparable.”

— Sherwin B. Nuland, M.D.

“Mesmerizing.”

“Read this book and fall back in love with life…. The prose…is as light as the sprightliest humor, as pungent as the scent of cooking apricots, as vigorous as the step of a young man setting out on a first date.”

— Edmund White

Genre: Non-fiction

Ryszard Kapuscinski's last book, The Soccer War — a revelation of the contemporary experience of war — prompted John le Carre to call the author "the conjurer extraordinary of modern reportage." Now, in Imperium, Kapuscinski gives us a work of equal emotional force and evocative power: a personal, brilliantly detailed exploration of the almost unfathomably complex Soviet empire in our time.

He begins with his own childhood memories of the postwar Soviet occupation of Pinsk, in what was then Poland's eastern frontier ("something dreadful and incomprehensible…in this world that I enter at seven years of age"), and takes us up to 1967, when, as a journalist just starting out, he traveled across a snow-covered and desolate Siberia, and through the Soviet Union's seven southern and Central Asian republics, territories whose individual histories, cultures, and religions he found thriving even within the "stiff, rigorous corset of Soviet power."

Between 1989 and 1991, Kapuscinski made a series of extended journeys through the disintegrating Soviet empire, and his account of these forms the heart of the book. Bypassing official institutions and itineraries, he traversed the Soviet territory alone, from the border of Poland to the site of the most infamous gulags in far-eastern Siberia (where "nature pals it up with the executioner"), from above the Arctic Circle to the edge of Afghanistan, visiting dozens of cities and towns and outposts, traveling more than 40,000 miles, venturing into the individual lives of men, women, and children in order to Understand the collapsing but still various larger life of the empire.

Bringing the book to a close is a collection of notes which, Kapuscinski writes, "arose in the margins of my journeys" — reflections on the state of the ex-USSR and on his experience of having watched its fate unfold "on the screen of a television set…as well as on the screen of the country's ordinary, daily reality, which surrounded me during my travels." It is this "schizophrenic perception in two different dimensions" that enabled Kapuscinski to discover and illuminate the most telling features of a society in dire turmoil.

Imperium is a remarkable work from one of the most original and sharply perceptive interpreters of our world — galvanizing narrative deeply informed by Kapuscinski's limitless curiosity and his passion for truth, and suffused with his vivid sense of the overwhelming importance of history as it is lived, and of our constantly shifting places within it.

Genre: Non-fiction

Тайная книга английской классики

Самая интересная книга на иностранном языке – непереведенная книга. Изюминкой английской классики в этом смысле является «My secret life» («Моя тайная жизнь»), написанная неизвестным автором в последней трети XIX века.

Впервые книга была напечатана анонимно в 1888 году. Кто ее написал – до сих пор идут споры. Значительная часть исследователей полагают, что автор – Генри Спенсер Эшби, торговец текстилем, путешественник, страстный букинист и коллекционер эротики, умерший в 1900 году. Он входил в кружок викторианских вольнодумцев – писателей (например, поэт Суинберн) и людей искусства, которые задыхались в атмосфере ханжества и фарисейства. После смерти от него осталось (помимо капиталов) грандиозное собрание порнографии и изданий Сервантеса, которое он завещал Британскому музею при условии принятия на хранение и эротической части его коллекции.

Как бы там ни было, «My secret life» вошла в историю мировой литературы именно как анонимная книга, отражающая нравы викторианской Англии, которые были в известных кругах совсем не викторианскими. Точнее, это 11-томный эпос, повествующий о поиске сексуального счастья на протяжении всей своей жизни мужчиной из среднего класса. Мужчиной, которому выпало родиться в ту эпоху, когда все связанное с полом загонялось либо под запрет, либо в самые тесные рамки. Мало на свете книг, в которых с подобной тщательностью описывались все интимные переживания человека от почти младенческого возраста до старости, причем литературно талантливо.

«My secret life» – уникальный документ как эпохи, так и человеческого существования вообще. Книга является существенными и необходимым дополнением к романам Диккенса и Теккерея, поскольку без нее представление о нравах Англии того времени будет либо неполным, либо неверным.

Джейн Остин писала гениальные книги о любви, ни разу никого не поцеловав и прожив жизнь стареющей девой на содержании у родственников. Психологию полов она постигала из косвенных свидетельств и собственных невинных наблюдений. Природная одаренность сделала свое дело, «Гордость и предубеждение», как и другие ее книги, стали классикой. Автор «My secret life» далеко не гений, но честность, абсолютная свобода от каких бы то ни было условностей, пунктуальность описаний делают его эпопею столь же значимой для изучающих ту эпоху, как и романы Остин.

Любопытен язык книги – бесхитростно-физиологический, называющий без стеснения вещи своими именами, при этом не показушно-вульгарный. Автор не знает эвфемизмов для обозначения известных частей человеческого тела и специфических глаголов, используя повседневные обороты мужчин его круга – даже по сегодняшним меркам чрезвычайно грубые. Тут нельзя не вспомнить удивление и возмущение Горького, обиженного тем, что граф Толстой, беседуя с ним о женщинах, употреблял подобные же «мужицкие» слова. Горький подумал было, что великий писатель земли русской подделывается под его «невежество», и лишь потом понял, что для Толстого это было вполне органично.

Так и автор «My secret life» показывает нам, что в Викторианскую эпоху ханжество касалось лишь известной части публики, тогда как большая часть народонаселения Британии выражалась весьма прямолинейно. Хотя нравы человечества во все времена и во всех странах, в общем-то, одинаковы. В «My secret life» рисуется типичное становление мужчины, которое могло бы иметь место и в Японии, и в России, и где угодно. Викторианские нравы лишь откладывали некий отпечаток на личность, но не могли задавить присущих ей стремлений. В Англии XIX века герой книги мог «охотиться» лишь на горничных и дочек батраков, «приличные» женщины были для него почти недоступны (за некоторыми исключениями). В этом – специфика эпохи. Сегодня бы автор «My secret life» не знал подобных препятствий и мог вести «большую игру». С другой стороны, в XIX веке для него считалось допустимым то, что сегодня бы моментально было бы зачислено под статью «педофилия» или «изнасилование». Сексуальная инициация героя воспоминаний произошла именно в результате настойчивого и совсем непристойного преследования барчуком невинной малолетней няньки своего братца. Служанка как объект первой интимной связи – сюжет достаточно обыденный для того времени, стоит только почитать Чехова, Бунина или Кафку. Сегодня ее заменяет одноклассница или однокурсница, или просто девушка из соседнего двора. В XIX столетии ровесницы из соседнего благополучного семейства были абсолютно недоступны.

Думается, современным феминисткам эта книга придется не по вкусу, несмотря на любовь на Западе ко всяким аутеничным картинкам нравов. Женщина для автора «My secret life» – не равноправный партнер, а объект наслаждения. Он порой видит в них личность, но слишком увлечен иным, чтобы вдаваться в этические переживания. К тому же для преуспевающего представителя среднего класса проститутки и горничные не слишком интересные собеседницы, они не люди его круга, а в то время социальная иерархия была куда жестче, чем сегодня, культурные различия между господами и слугами являлись почти непреодолимыми. Барин взаимодействовал со служанкой только в парадигме «хозяин–слуга» или в постели, где джентльмен мог позволить себе немного забыть о принадлежности к разным классам, не теряя, однако, из виду свое превосходство. Никаких нежностей вроде букетов цветов или стишков в таких мезальянсах не существовало. Господин считал, что и так оказал служанке много чести самим фактом, что обратил на нее внимание.

Любопытно сравнить «My secret life» с известным романом Джона Фаулза «Женщина французского лейтенанта» – как раз о том же самом времени. Тогда как герой Фаулза полон экзистенциальных томлений, а роман насыщен философскими размышлениями, герой «My secret life» ломает голову только над алгоритмом соблазнения очередной жертвы и чужд всякой философии, равно как и морали. Но он – реален, он человек из крови и плоти, а герой Фаулза – выдуманный и слишком книжный, как и остальные персонажи его романа. Можно полагать, что нынешним читателям покажется более интересным и волнующим рассказ анонима о своем времени, чем наукообразные домыслы писателя, жившего сто лет спустя.

В год своего первого издания «My secret life» шла по разряду утонченной порнографии. Сегодня историки английской литературы признают ее художественные достоинства, и книга изучается в университетах, по ней защищают диссертации. O tempore, o mores!

2008-09-18 / Максим Артемьев

Рецензия взята отсюда: http://exlibris.ng.ru/history/2008-09-18/6_classica.html

Word Statistics

Word — Occurences

Cunt — 5357

Fuck — 4032

Prick — 3756

Frig — 1299

Hair — 1569

Bum — 937

Sperm — 718

Cock — 741

Arse — 526

Clitoris — 434

Gay — 398

Quim — 389

Buttocks — 369

Spunk — 362

Virgin — 360

Breast — 316

Lick — 304

Piss — 305

Gamahuche — 227

Erotic — 187

Bugger — 106

Vagina — 68

Glossary

frig — to masturbate

gamahuche — to practise fellatio or cunnilingus, hence gamahucher.

gambols — frisky, frolicsome movements

lapunar — A brothel

motte — Mound. Pubic area. Mons pubis.

nymphae — The labia minora (inner lips) of the vulva.

onanism — Masturbation

Paphian — pertaining to love, or unlawful sexual indulgence, or belonging to the class of prostitutes

pudenda — The external genital organs of a woman.

quim — The external female genitals; the vagina.

spunk — Seminal fluid

Genre: Non-fiction

According to Mark Phillips and Cathy O'Brien, the United States is run by an elite group of New World Order fanatics who are involved in the abduction of sexually abused children. These children are brainwashed and turned into slaves by the US Government. Cathy O'Brien claims that she was abducted into the CIA's MK Ultra mind control project, suffered years of torture and abuse and would have been killed if not for her rescue by Mark Phillips. Written in a lucid hallucinatory style, Trance is hard to put down. The names named and the crimes sighted are of a magnitude beyond anything you can imagine.

Genre: Non-fiction

According to Mark Phillips and Cathy O'Brien, the United States is run by an elite group of New World Order fanatics who are involved in the abduction of sexually abused children. These children are brainwashed and turned into slaves by the US Government. Cathy O'Brien claims that she was abducted into the CIA's MK Ultra mind control project, suffered years of torture and abuse and would have been killed if not for her rescue by Mark Phillips. Written in a lucid hallucinatory style, Trance is hard to put down. The names named and the crimes sighted are of a magnitude beyond anything you can imagine.