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Biography and the Memoirs 487 book

Genre: Prose

When this true-crime story first appeared in 1980, it made the New York Times bestseller list within weeks. Two decades later, it's being rereleased in conjunction with a film version produced by DreamWorks. In the space of five years, Frank Abagnale passed $2.5 million in fraudulent checks in every state and 26 foreign countries. He did it by pioneering implausible and brazen scams, such as impersonating a Pan Am pilot (puddle jumping around the world in the cockpit, even taking over the controls). He also played the role of a pediatrician and faked his way into the position of temporary resident supervisor at a hospital in Georgia. Posing as a lawyer, he conned his way into a position in a state attorney general's office, and he taught a semester of college-level sociology with a purloined degree from Columbia University.

The kicker is, he was actually a teenage high school dropout. Now an authority on counterfeiting and secure documents, Abagnale tells of his years of impersonations, swindles, and felonies with humor and the kind of confidence that enabled him to pull off his poseur performances. "Modesty is not one of my virtues. At the time, virtue was not one of my virtues," he writes. In fact, he did it all for his overactive libido-he needed money and status to woo the girls. He also loved a challenge and the ego boost that came with playing important men. What's not disclosed in this highly engaging tale is that Abagnale was released from prison after five years on the condition that he help the government write fraud-prevention programs. So, if you're planning to pick up some tips from this highly detailed manifesto on paperhanging, be warned: this master has already foiled you. -Lesley Reed

***

"A book that captivates from first page to last." – West Coast Review of Books

"Whatever the reader may think of his crimes, the reader will wind up chortling with and cheering along the criminal." – Charlottesville Progress

"Zingingly told… richly detailed and winning as the devil." – Kirkus Reviews – Review

Genre: Non-fiction

Gerald Durrell was born in India in 1925. His family settled on Corfu when he was a boy and he spent his time studying its wildlife. He relates these experiences in the trilogy beginning with My Family and Other Animals, and continuing with Birds, Beasts and Relatives and The Garden of the Gods. He writes with wry humour and great perception about both the humans and the animals he meets.

On leaving Corfu, Durrell returned to England to work at Whipsnade Park as a student keeper. His adventures there are told with characteristic energy in Beasts in My Belfry. A few years later, he began organizing his own animal-collecting expeditions. The first, to the Cameroons, was followed by expeditions to Paraguay, Argentina and Sierra Leone. He recounts these experiences in a number of books including The Drunken Forest. He also visited many countries while shooting various television series.

In 1959 Durrell realized a lifelong dream when he set up the Jersey Zoological Park, followed a few years later by the Jersey Wildlife Preservation Trust, renamed the Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust in 1999.

Whether in a factual account of an expedition or a work of non-fiction, Durrell’s style is exuberant, passionate and acutely observed. Gerald Durrell died in 1995.

Genre: Non-fiction

The team behind the bestseller turns conventional biography on its head—and shakes out the good stuff.

Following their Herculean—or is it Sisyphean?—efforts to save the living from ignorance, the two wittiest Johns in the English language turn their attention to the dead.

As the authors themselves say, “The first thing that strikes you about the Dead is just how many of them there are.” Helpfully, Lloyd and Mitchinson have employed a simple—but ruthless—criterion for inclusion: the dead person has to be interesting.

Here, then, is a dictionary of the dead, an encyclopedia of the embalmed. Ludicrous in scope, whimsical in its arrangement, this wildly entertaining tome presents pithy and provocative biographies of the no-longer-living from the famous to the undeservedly and—until now—permanently obscure. Spades in hand, Lloyd and Mitchinson have dug up everything embarrassing, fascinating, and downright weird about their subjects’ lives and added their own uniquely irreverent observations.

Organized by capricious categories—such as dead people who died virgins, who kept pet monkeys, who lost limbs, whose corpses refused to stay put—the dearly departed, from the inventor of the stove to a cross-dressing, bear-baiting female gangster finally receive the epitaphs they truly deserve.

Discover:

• Why Freud had a lifelong fear of trains

• The one thing that really made Isaac Newton laugh

• How Catherine the Great really died (no horse was involved)

Much like the country doctor who cured smallpox (he’s in here), Lloyd and Mitchinson have the perfect antidote for anyone out there dying of boredom. —like life itself—is hilarious, tragic, bizarre, and amazing. You may never pass a graveyard again without chuckling.

Genre: Non-fiction

The outrageous exploits of one of this century’s greatest scientific minds and a legendary American original. In this phenomenal national bestseller, the Nobel Prize-winning physicist Richard P. Feynman recounts in his inimitable voice his adventures trading ideas on atomic physics with Einstein and Bohr and ideas on gambling with Nick the Greek, painting a naked female toreador, accompanying a ballet on his bongo drums and much else of an eyebrow-raising and hilarious nature. A New York Times bestseller; more than 500,000 copies sold.

Genre: Prose

In 1995, Jean-Dominique Bauby was the editor-in-chief of French , the father of two young children, a 44-year-old man known and loved for his wit, his style, and his impassioned approach to life. By the end of the year he was also the victim of a rare kind of stroke to the brainstem. After 20 days in a coma, Bauby awoke into a body which had all but stopped working: only his left eye functioned, allowing him to see and, by blinking it, to make clear that his mind was unimpaired. Almost miraculously, he was soon able to express himself in the richest detail: dictating a word at a time, blinking to select each letter as the alphabet was recited to him slowly, over and over again. In the same way, he was able eventually to compose this extraordinary book.

By turns wistful, mischievous, angry, and witty, Bauby bears witness to his determination to live as fully in his mind as he had been able to do in his body. He explains the joy, and deep sadness, of seeing his children and of hearing his aged father’s voice on the phone. In magical sequences, he imagines traveling to other places and times and of lying next to the woman he loves. Fed only intravenously, he imagines preparing and tasting the full flavor of delectable dishes. Again and again he returns to an “inexhaustible reservoir of sensations,” keeping in touch with himself and the life around him.

Jean-Dominique Bauby died two days after the French publication of .

This book is a lasting testament to his life.

Acclaim for Jean-Dominique Bauby’s “The Diving Bell and the Butterfly”

“The sentences soar, unburdened by self-pity or despair, and the progression of short, lyrical chapters begin to resemble the beating of wings.”

“An admirable testament to the unkillable self, to the spirit that insists on itself so vehemently that it ultimately transcends and escapes the prison of the body.”

— Francine Prose,

“The most remarkable memoir of our time—perhaps of any time.”

— Cynthia Ozick

“Shattering eloquence…. The real glory here is Bauby himself, whose spirit asserts itself again and again in the words that survive him.”

“To read this most extraordinary of narratives is to discover the luminosity within a courageous man's mind…. Incomparable.”

— Sherwin B. Nuland, M.D.

“Mesmerizing.”

“Read this book and fall back in love with life…. The prose…is as light as the sprightliest humor, as pungent as the scent of cooking apricots, as vigorous as the step of a young man setting out on a first date.”

— Edmund White

Genre: Non-fiction

Тайная книга английской классики

Самая интересная книга на иностранном языке – непереведенная книга. Изюминкой английской классики в этом смысле является «My secret life» («Моя тайная жизнь»), написанная неизвестным автором в последней трети XIX века.

Впервые книга была напечатана анонимно в 1888 году. Кто ее написал – до сих пор идут споры. Значительная часть исследователей полагают, что автор – Генри Спенсер Эшби, торговец текстилем, путешественник, страстный букинист и коллекционер эротики, умерший в 1900 году. Он входил в кружок викторианских вольнодумцев – писателей (например, поэт Суинберн) и людей искусства, которые задыхались в атмосфере ханжества и фарисейства. После смерти от него осталось (помимо капиталов) грандиозное собрание порнографии и изданий Сервантеса, которое он завещал Британскому музею при условии принятия на хранение и эротической части его коллекции.

Как бы там ни было, «My secret life» вошла в историю мировой литературы именно как анонимная книга, отражающая нравы викторианской Англии, которые были в известных кругах совсем не викторианскими. Точнее, это 11-томный эпос, повествующий о поиске сексуального счастья на протяжении всей своей жизни мужчиной из среднего класса. Мужчиной, которому выпало родиться в ту эпоху, когда все связанное с полом загонялось либо под запрет, либо в самые тесные рамки. Мало на свете книг, в которых с подобной тщательностью описывались все интимные переживания человека от почти младенческого возраста до старости, причем литературно талантливо.

«My secret life» – уникальный документ как эпохи, так и человеческого существования вообще. Книга является существенными и необходимым дополнением к романам Диккенса и Теккерея, поскольку без нее представление о нравах Англии того времени будет либо неполным, либо неверным.

Джейн Остин писала гениальные книги о любви, ни разу никого не поцеловав и прожив жизнь стареющей девой на содержании у родственников. Психологию полов она постигала из косвенных свидетельств и собственных невинных наблюдений. Природная одаренность сделала свое дело, «Гордость и предубеждение», как и другие ее книги, стали классикой. Автор «My secret life» далеко не гений, но честность, абсолютная свобода от каких бы то ни было условностей, пунктуальность описаний делают его эпопею столь же значимой для изучающих ту эпоху, как и романы Остин.

Любопытен язык книги – бесхитростно-физиологический, называющий без стеснения вещи своими именами, при этом не показушно-вульгарный. Автор не знает эвфемизмов для обозначения известных частей человеческого тела и специфических глаголов, используя повседневные обороты мужчин его круга – даже по сегодняшним меркам чрезвычайно грубые. Тут нельзя не вспомнить удивление и возмущение Горького, обиженного тем, что граф Толстой, беседуя с ним о женщинах, употреблял подобные же «мужицкие» слова. Горький подумал было, что великий писатель земли русской подделывается под его «невежество», и лишь потом понял, что для Толстого это было вполне органично.

Так и автор «My secret life» показывает нам, что в Викторианскую эпоху ханжество касалось лишь известной части публики, тогда как большая часть народонаселения Британии выражалась весьма прямолинейно. Хотя нравы человечества во все времена и во всех странах, в общем-то, одинаковы. В «My secret life» рисуется типичное становление мужчины, которое могло бы иметь место и в Японии, и в России, и где угодно. Викторианские нравы лишь откладывали некий отпечаток на личность, но не могли задавить присущих ей стремлений. В Англии XIX века герой книги мог «охотиться» лишь на горничных и дочек батраков, «приличные» женщины были для него почти недоступны (за некоторыми исключениями). В этом – специфика эпохи. Сегодня бы автор «My secret life» не знал подобных препятствий и мог вести «большую игру». С другой стороны, в XIX веке для него считалось допустимым то, что сегодня бы моментально было бы зачислено под статью «педофилия» или «изнасилование». Сексуальная инициация героя воспоминаний произошла именно в результате настойчивого и совсем непристойного преследования барчуком невинной малолетней няньки своего братца. Служанка как объект первой интимной связи – сюжет достаточно обыденный для того времени, стоит только почитать Чехова, Бунина или Кафку. Сегодня ее заменяет одноклассница или однокурсница, или просто девушка из соседнего двора. В XIX столетии ровесницы из соседнего благополучного семейства были абсолютно недоступны.

Думается, современным феминисткам эта книга придется не по вкусу, несмотря на любовь на Западе ко всяким аутеничным картинкам нравов. Женщина для автора «My secret life» – не равноправный партнер, а объект наслаждения. Он порой видит в них личность, но слишком увлечен иным, чтобы вдаваться в этические переживания. К тому же для преуспевающего представителя среднего класса проститутки и горничные не слишком интересные собеседницы, они не люди его круга, а в то время социальная иерархия была куда жестче, чем сегодня, культурные различия между господами и слугами являлись почти непреодолимыми. Барин взаимодействовал со служанкой только в парадигме «хозяин–слуга» или в постели, где джентльмен мог позволить себе немного забыть о принадлежности к разным классам, не теряя, однако, из виду свое превосходство. Никаких нежностей вроде букетов цветов или стишков в таких мезальянсах не существовало. Господин считал, что и так оказал служанке много чести самим фактом, что обратил на нее внимание.

Любопытно сравнить «My secret life» с известным романом Джона Фаулза «Женщина французского лейтенанта» – как раз о том же самом времени. Тогда как герой Фаулза полон экзистенциальных томлений, а роман насыщен философскими размышлениями, герой «My secret life» ломает голову только над алгоритмом соблазнения очередной жертвы и чужд всякой философии, равно как и морали. Но он – реален, он человек из крови и плоти, а герой Фаулза – выдуманный и слишком книжный, как и остальные персонажи его романа. Можно полагать, что нынешним читателям покажется более интересным и волнующим рассказ анонима о своем времени, чем наукообразные домыслы писателя, жившего сто лет спустя.

В год своего первого издания «My secret life» шла по разряду утонченной порнографии. Сегодня историки английской литературы признают ее художественные достоинства, и книга изучается в университетах, по ней защищают диссертации. O tempore, o mores!

2008-09-18 / Максим Артемьев

Рецензия взята отсюда: http://exlibris.ng.ru/history/2008-09-18/6_classica.html

Word Statistics

Word — Occurences

Cunt — 5357

Fuck — 4032

Prick — 3756

Frig — 1299

Hair — 1569

Bum — 937

Sperm — 718

Cock — 741

Arse — 526

Clitoris — 434

Gay — 398

Quim — 389

Buttocks — 369

Spunk — 362

Virgin — 360

Breast — 316

Lick — 304

Piss — 305

Gamahuche — 227

Erotic — 187

Bugger — 106

Vagina — 68

Glossary

frig — to masturbate

gamahuche — to practise fellatio or cunnilingus, hence gamahucher.

gambols — frisky, frolicsome movements

lapunar — A brothel

motte — Mound. Pubic area. Mons pubis.

nymphae — The labia minora (inner lips) of the vulva.

onanism — Masturbation

Paphian — pertaining to love, or unlawful sexual indulgence, or belonging to the class of prostitutes

pudenda — The external genital organs of a woman.

quim — The external female genitals; the vagina.

spunk — Seminal fluid

Genre: Non-fiction

According to Mark Phillips and Cathy O'Brien, the United States is run by an elite group of New World Order fanatics who are involved in the abduction of sexually abused children. These children are brainwashed and turned into slaves by the US Government. Cathy O'Brien claims that she was abducted into the CIA's MK Ultra mind control project, suffered years of torture and abuse and would have been killed if not for her rescue by Mark Phillips. Written in a lucid hallucinatory style, Trance is hard to put down. The names named and the crimes sighted are of a magnitude beyond anything you can imagine.

Genre: Non-fiction

According to Mark Phillips and Cathy O'Brien, the United States is run by an elite group of New World Order fanatics who are involved in the abduction of sexually abused children. These children are brainwashed and turned into slaves by the US Government. Cathy O'Brien claims that she was abducted into the CIA's MK Ultra mind control project, suffered years of torture and abuse and would have been killed if not for her rescue by Mark Phillips. Written in a lucid hallucinatory style, Trance is hard to put down. The names named and the crimes sighted are of a magnitude beyond anything you can imagine.

Genre: Non-fiction

Author's Note: This book is written in the style of an oral history, a form which requires interviewing a wide variety of witnesses and compiling their testimony. Anytime multiple sources are questioned about a shared experience, it's inevitable for them occasionally to contradict each other. For additional biographies written in this style, please see by George Plimpton, by Jean Stein, and by Brendan Mullen.

‘I’m a good person inside, but when I get drunk, I just don't know. It's just… when I get drunk, don’t mess the fuck with me…’ There have been few female serial killers but Aileen ‘Lee’ Wuornos was an incredible example of this rare species of death-row inhabitants.

All-too-often female prostitutes have been the victims of male serial killers – the killings of Aileen ‘Lee’ Wuornos were the inverse of this. She was a child prostitute, fleeing an abusive childhood at the hands of her grandparents, which led straight into a disastrous adulthood of difficult affairs with both men and women. Her metamorphosis from victim to attacker had brutal consequences: a stream of dead men.

Following a renewed interest in this woman after the film ‘Monster’, this is her story in her own words.

NB The cover is entitled .

Genre: Non-fiction

Books on Buddhism may overflow the shelves, but the life story of the Buddha himself has remained obscure despite over 2,500 years of influence on millions of people around the world. In an attempt to rectify this, and to make the Buddha and Buddhism accessible to Westerners, the beloved scholar and author of such sweeping religious studies as A History of God has written a readable, sophisticated, and somewhat unconventional biography of one of the most influential people of all time. Buddha himself fought against the cult of personality, and the Buddhist scriptures were faithful, giving few details of his life and personality. Karen Armstrong mines these early scriptures, as well as later biographies, then fleshes the story out with an explanation of the cultural landscape of the 6th century B.C., creating a deft blend of biography, history, philosophy, and mythology.

At the age of 29, Siddhartha Gautama walked away from the insulated pleasure palace that had been his home and joined a growing force of wandering monks searching for spiritual enlightenment during an age of upheaval. Armstrong traces Gautama's journey through yoga and asceticism and grounds it in the varied religious teachings of the time. In many parts of the world during this so-called axial age, new religions were developing as a response to growing urbanization and market forces. Yet each shared a common impulse-they placed faith increasingly on the individual who was to seek inner depth rather than magical control. Taoism and Confucianism, Hinduism, monotheism in the Middle East and Iran, and Greek rationalism were all emerging as Gautama made his determined way towards enlightenment under the boddhi tree and during the next 45 years that he spent teaching along the banks of the Ganges. Armstrong, in her intelligent and clarifying style, is quick to point out the Buddha's relevance to our own time of transition, struggle, and spiritual void in both his approach-which was based on skepticism and empiricism-and his teachings.

Despite the lack of typical historical documentation, Armstrong has written a rich and revealing description of both a unique time in history and an unusual man. Buddha is a terrific primer for those interested in the origins and fundamentals of Buddhism.

Considering the hundreds of thousands of words that have been written about Shakespeare, relatively little is known about the man himself. In the absence of much documentation about his life, we have the plays and poetry he wrote. In this addition to the Eminent Lives series, bestselling author Bryson (The Life and Times of the Thunderbolt Kid) does what he does best: marshaling the usual little facts that others might overlook-for example, that in Shakespeare's day perhaps 40% of women were pregnant when they got married-to paint a portrait of the world in which the Bard lived and prospered. Bryson's curiosity serves him well, as he delves into subjects as diverse as the reliability of the extant images of Shakespeare, a brief history of the theater in England and the continuing debates about whether William Shakespeare of Stratford-upon-Avon really wrote Shakespeare's works. Bryson is a pleasant and funny guide to a subject at once overexposed and elusive-as Bryson puts it, he is a kind of literary equivalent of an electron-forever there and not there.

Genre: Non-fiction

"'Stephen Fry is one of the great originals… This autobiography of his first twenty years is a pleasure to read, mixing outrageous acts with sensible opinions in bewildering confusion… That so much outward charm, self-awareness and intellect should exist alongside behaviour that threatened to ruin the lives of innocent victims, noble parents and Fry himself, gives the book a tragic grandeur and lifts it to classic status.' Financial Times; 'A remarkable, perhaps even unique, exercise in autobiography… that aroma of authenticity that is the point of all great autobiographies; of which this, I rather think, is one' Evening Standard; 'He writes superbly about his family, about his homosexuality, about the agonies of childhood… some of his bursts of simile take the breath away… his most satisfying and appealing book so far' Observer"

Genre: Prose

Here at last is the sensational sequel to "Papillon" – the great story of escape and adventure that took the world by storm. "Banco" continues the adventures of Henri Charriere – nicknamed 'Papillon' – in Venezuela, where he has finally won his freedom after thirteen years of escape and imprisonment. Despite his resolve to become an honest man, Charriere is soon involved in hair-raising exploits with goldminers, gamblers, bank-robbers and revolutionaries – robbing and being robbed, his lust for life as strong as ever. He also runs night-clubs in Caracas until an earthquake ruins him in 1967 – when he decides to write the book that brings him international fame. Henri Charriere died in 1973 at the age of 66.

When federal agents knocked on her door with an indictment in hand, Piper Kerman barely resembled the reckless young woman she was shortly after graduating Smith College. Happily ensconced in a New York City apartment, with a promising career and an attentive boyfriend, Piper was forced to reckon with the consequences of her very brief, very careless dalliance in the world of drug trafficking.

Following a plea deal for her 10-year-old crime, Piper spent a year in the infamous women’s correctional facility in Danbury, Connecticut, which she found to be no “Club Fed.” In Orange is the New Black: My Year in a Women’s Prison , Piper takes readers into B-Dorm, a community of colorful, eccentric, vividly drawn women. Their stories raise issues of friendship and family, mental illness, the odd cliques and codes of behavior, the role of religion, the uneasy relationship between prisoner and jailor, and the almost complete lack of guidance for life after prison.

Compelling, moving, and often hilarious, Orange is the New Black sheds a unique light on life inside a women’s prison, by a Smith College graduate who did the crime and did the time.

Genre: Non-fiction

For former hotel manager Paul Rusesabagina, words are the most powerful weapon in the human arsenal. For good and for evil, as was the case in the spring of 1994 in Rwanda. Over 100 days, some 800,000 people were slaughtered, most hacked to death by machete. Rusesabagina—inspiration for the movie Hotel Rwanda—used his facility with words and persuasion to save 1,268 of his fellow countrymen, turning the Belgian luxury hotel under his charge into a sanctuary from madness. Through negotiation, favor, flattery and deception, Rusesabagina managed to keep his "guests" alive another day despite the homicidal gangs just beyond the fence and the world's failure to act. Narrator Hoffman delivers those words in a stirring audio performance. With a crisp African accent, Hoffman renders each sentence with heartfelt conviction and flat-out becomes Rusesabagina. The humble hotel manager not only illuminates the machinery behind the genocide but delves into Rwanda 's complex and colorful cultural history as well as his own childhood, the son of a Hutu father and Tutsi mother. Hoffman successfully draws out the understated elegance of Rusesabagina's simple and straightforward prose, lending the story added vividness. This tale of good, evil and moral responsibility winds down with Rusesabagina visiting a church outside Kigali where thousands were massacred and where a multilingual sign-cloth now pledges, "Never Again." He once more stops to consider words, the ones he worries lack true conviction—like those at the church—as well as the ones with the power to heal. For the listener, the words of Paul Rusesabagina won't soon be forgotten.

Genre: Non-fiction

How did top Red Army commanders see the assault on Berlin in 1945 – what was their experience of the last, terrible battle of the Second World War in Europe? Personal accounts by the most famous generals involved – Zhukov, Koniev and Chuikov – have been published in English, but the recollections of their principal subordinates haven’t been available in the west before, and it is their role in the final Soviet offensive that is the focus of Tony Le Tissier’s fascinating book. These were the officers who were responsible for the execution of the Red Army’s plan for the assault, in immediate touch with the troops on the front line of the advance. They saw most clearly where the operation succeeded and where it failed. Their recollections, publication of which was long banned in the Soviet Union, throw a new light on the course of battle and on the inner workings of the Red Army command in the final phase of the conflict.

Genre: Non-fiction

Part diary and part reportage, is a remarkable chronicle of war in the late twentieth century. Between 1958 and 1980, working primarily for the Polish Press Agency, Kapuscinski covered twenty-seven revolutions and coups in Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East. Here, with characteristic cogency and emotional immediacy, he recounts the stories behind his official press dispatches — searing firsthand accounts of the frightening, grotesque, and comically absurd aspects of life during war. is a singular work of journalism.

Genre: Non-fiction

In 1975, Angola was tumbling into pandemonium; everyone who could was packing crates, desperate to abandon the beleaguered colony. With his trademark bravura, Ryszard Kapuscinski went the other way, begging his was from Lisbon and comfort to Luanda — once famed as Africa's Rio de Janeiro — and chaos.

Angola, a slave colony later given over to mining and plantations, was a promised land for generations of poor Portuguese. It had belonged to Portugal since before there were English-speakers in North America. After the collapse of the fascist dictatorship in Portugal in 1974, Angola was brusquely cut loose, spurring the catastrophe of a still-ongoing civil war. Kapuscinski plunged right into the middle of the drama, driving past thousands of haphazardly placed check-points, where using the wrong shibboleth was a matter of life and death; recording his imporessions of the young soldiers — from Cuba, Angola, South Africa, Portugal — fighting a nebulous war with global repercussions; and examining the peculiar brutality of a country surprised and divided by its newfound freedom.

Genre: Non-fiction

In 1957, Ryszard Kapuscinski arrived in Africa to witness the beginning of the end of colonial rule as the first African correspondent of Poland's state newspaper. From the early days of independence in Ghana to the ongoing ethnic genocide in Rwanda, Kapuscinski has crisscrossed vast distances pursuing the swift, and often violent, events that followed liberation. Kapuscinski hitchhikes with caravans, wanders the Sahara with nomads, and lives in the poverty-stricken slums of Nigeria. He wrestles a king cobra to the death and suffers through a bout of malaria. What emerges is an extraordinary depiction of Africa-not as a group of nations or geographic locations-but as a vibrant and frequently joyous montage of peoples, cultures, and encounters. Kapuscinski's trenchant observations, wry analysis and overwhelming humanity paint a remarkable portrait of the continent and its people. His unorthodox approach and profound respect for the people he meets challenge conventional understandings of the modern problems faced by Africa at the dawn of the twenty-first century.

The city of St. Petersburg became the center of liberal opposition to the dominating power of the state, whether czarist or communist. Acclaimed Russian historian and emigre Volkov writes the definitive “cultural biography” of that famed city, sharply detailing the well-known figures of the arts whose works are now part of the permanent fabric of Western high culture.

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Genre: Non-fiction

In the bestselling Italian Neighbours, Tim Parks explores the idiosyncrasies and nuances of Italian culture. When Parks moved to Italy he found it irresistible; this book is a testament to his love of Italy and his attention to the details of everyday Italian life.

Lt Col Phil M. “Goldie” Haun (BS, Harvard University; MA, Vanderbilt University) is from Cecilia, Kentucky, a weapons school graduate, and had A-10 assignments in England, Korea, Germany, and Alaska. Colonel Haun attended ACSC and SAASS and is curently serving as the operational officer of the 355th Fighter Squadron (FS) at Eielson AFB, Alaska.

Col Christopher E. “Kimos” Haave (USAFA) commanded 81st FS “Panthers” during Operation Allied Force (OAF) and is currently the commander of the 612th Air Operations Group at Davis-Monthan AFB, New Mexico. Kimos had A-10 assignments in England and Germany and flew AT-38s in New Mexico. Colonel Haave is Olmsted Scholar and a graduate of the French Joint Defense College.

Colonels Haave and Haun organized the firsthand accounts of members of the 40th Expeditionary Operations Group into this book. Their descriptions of the application of airpower—a new wingman’s first combat sortie, a support officer’s view of an FS relocation during combat, and Sandy pilot’s efforts to find and rescue a downed F-177 pilot—provide the reader with a legitimate insight into an air war at the tactical level and the airpower that helped convice Milosevic to capitulate.

Opinions, conclusions, and recommendations expressed or implied within are solely those of the editors and do not necessarily represent the views of Air University, the United States Air Force, the Department of Defense, or any other US government agency. Cleared for public release: distribution unlimited.

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