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Genre: Adventures

Based on fifteen years of research, Glock is the riveting story of the weapon that has become known as American’s gun. Today the Glock pistol has been embraced by two-thirds of all U.S. police departments, glamorized in countless Hollywood movies, and featured as a ubiquitous presence on prime-time TV. It has been rhapsodized by hip-hop artists, and coveted by cops and crooks alike.

Created in 1982 by Gaston Glock, an obscure Austrian curtain-rod manufacturer, and swiftly adopted by the Austrian army, the Glock pistol, with its lightweight plastic frame and large-capacity spring-action magazine, arrived in America at a fortuitous time. Law enforcement agencies had concluded that their agents and officers, armed with standard six-round revolvers, were getting "outgunned" by drug dealers with semi-automatic pistols. They needed a new gun.

When Karl Water, a firearm salesman based in the U.S. first saw a Glock in 1984, his reaction was, “Jeez, that’s ugly.” But the advantages of the pistol soon became apparent. The standard semi-automatic Glock could fire as many as 17 bullets from its magazine without reloading (one equipped with an extended thirty-three cartridge magazine was used in Tucson to shoot Gabrielle Giffords and 19 others). It was built with only 36 parts that were interchangeable with those of other models. You could drop it underwater, toss it from a helicopter, or leave it out in the snow, and it would still fire. It was reliable, accurate, lightweight, and cheaper to produce than Smith and Wesson’s revolver. Made in part of hardened plastic, it was even rumored (incorrectly) to be invisible to airport security screening.

Filled with corporate intrigue, political maneuvering, Hollywood glitz, bloody shoot-outs—and an attempt on Gaston Glock’s life by a former lieutenant—Glock is at once the inside account of how Glock the company went about marketing its pistol to police agencies and later the public, as well as a compelling chronicle of the evolution of gun culture in America.

Genre: Non-fiction

For most of us, traveling means visiting the most beautiful places on Earth—Paris, the Taj Mahal, the Grand Canyon. It’s rare to book a plane ticket to visit the lifeless moonscape of Canada’s oil sand strip mines, or to seek out the Chinese city of Linfen, legendary as the most polluted in the world. But in , Andrew Blackwell embraces a different kind of travel, taking a jaunt through the most gruesomely polluted places on Earth.

From the hidden bars and convenience stores of a radioactive wilderness to the sacred but reeking waters of India, fuses immersive first-person reporting with satire and analysis, making the case that it’s time to start appreciating our planet as it is—not as we wish it would be. Irreverent and reflective, the book is a love letter to our biosphere’s most tainted, most degraded ecosystems, and a measured consideration of what they mean for us.

Equal parts travelogue, expose, environmental memoir, and faux guidebook, Blackwell careens through a rogue’s gallery of environmental disaster areas in search of the worst the world has to offer—and approaches a deeper understanding of what’s really happening to our planet in the process.

Review

“A wise, witty travel adventure that packs a punch—and one of the most entertaining and informative books I’ve read in years. is a joy to read and will make you think.”

—Dan Rather

“Andrew Blackwell takes eco-tourism into a whole new space. is a darkly comic romp.”

—Elizabeth Kolbert, staff writer at and author of .

“Entertaining, appealing, and thoughtful travelogue covers some of the world's most befouled spots with lively, agile wit… The book… offers an astute critique of how visions of blighted spots create an either/or vision of how to care for the environment and live in the world.”

—Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“We’ve got lessons to learn from disaster sites. Thankfully, means we don’t have to learn them first-hand. Cancel your holiday to Chernobyl: Pick up this brilliant book!”

—The Yes Men

“Avoids the trendy tropes of ‘ecotourism’ in favor of the infinitely more interesting world of eco-disaster tourism… Blackwell is a smart and often funny writer, who has produced a complex portrait in a genre that typically avoids complexity in favor of outrage.”

“Andrew Blackwell is a wonderful tour guide to the least wonderful places on earth. His book is a riveting toxic adventure. But more than just entertaining, the book will teach you a lot about the environment and the future of our increasingly polluted world.”

—A. J. Jacobs, bestselling author of

“With a touch of wry wit and a reporter's keen eye, Andrew Blackwell plays tourist in the centers of environmental destruction and finds sardonic entertainment alongside tragedy. His meticulous observations will make you laugh and weep, and you will get an important education along the way.”

—David K. Shipler, winner of the Pulitzer Prize and author of

“I’m a contrarian traveler. I don’t obey any airport signs. I love the off season. And, when someone says to avoid a certain place, and almost every time the U.S. State Department issues a travel warning, that destination immediately becomes attractive to me. is my new favorite guidebook to some places I admit to have visited. As a journalist, as well as a traveler, I consider this is an essential read. It is a very funny—and very disturbing look at some parts of our world that need to be acknowledged before we take our next trip anywhere else.”

—Peter Greenberg, Travel Editor for

“Humor and dry wit lighten a travelogue of the most polluted and ravaged places in the world… With great verve, and without sounding preachy, he exposes the essence and interconnectedness of these environmental problems.”

“In ‘Visit Sunny Chernobyl: And Other Adventures in the World’s Most Polluted Places,’ Blackwell avoids the trendy tropes of “ecotourism” in favor of the infinitely more interesting world of eco-disaster tourism… [Visit Sunny Chernobyl] is a nuanced understanding of environmental degradation and its affects on those living in contaminated areas… [Blackwell] offers a diligently evenhanded perspective… Blackwell is a smart and often funny writer, who has produced a complex portrait in a genre that typically avoids complexity in favor of outrage.”

“In this lively tour of smog-shrouded cities, clear-cut forests, and the radioactive zone around a failed Soviet reactor, a witty journalist ponders the appeal of ruins and a consumer society’s conflicted approach to environmental woes.”

“Entertaining, appealing, and thoughtful travelogue covers some of the world’s most befouled spots with lively, agile wit… The book … offers an astute critique of how visions of blighted spots create an either/or vision of how to care for the environment and live in the world.”

— (starred review)

“Devastatingly hip and brutally relevant.”

—, Starred Review

“ is hard to categorize—part travelogue, part memoir, part environmental exposé—but it is not hard to praise. It’s wonderfully engaging, extremely readable and, yes, remarkably informative… An engagingly honest reflection on travel to some of the world's worst environments by a guide with considerable knowledge to share.”

—Roni K. Devlin, owner of

“Ghastliness permeates Visit Sunny Chernobyl… [Blackwell] presents vivid descriptions of these wretched places, along with both their polluters and the crusaders who are trying—usually without success—to clean them up.”

Genre: Humor

The first and best compendium of facts weirder than fiction, of intriguing information and must-talk-about trivia has spawned many imitators — but none as addictive or successful. For nearly three decades, the editors have been researching curious facts, unusual statistics and the incredible stories behind them. Now, the most entertaining and informative of these have been brought together in a thoroughly up-to-date edition. Published all over the world, and containing lists written specially for each country, this edition has something for everyone.

Guide to modern air combat.

Video lessons: http://youtu.be/OCFMX5z-ed4

[C tables. Best viewed with CoolReader.]

An outstanding analysis of why and how protection, Obedience, and Tracking all play an integral part in Schutzhund training, with emphasis on selecting and raising a dog to suit the owner’s needs.

In this excerpt from , John D. McCann introduces you to the various types of knives and helps you choose the .

Most survival experts agree that the most important survival tool is a knife. Learn how to choose a survival knife and the importance of heat treating.

* * *

Genre: Non-fiction

Everyone needs this book if they want to know how to get out of difficult situations whether at home or abroad. Written by Rosie Garthwaite, whose career as a journalist started in war-torn Basra, this book combines practical advice with contributions from many journalists and commentators including Rageh Omar and John Simpson, who share their own experience and advice on surviving in difficult and dangerous situations. Topics include how to avoid being misunderstood; how to avoid bombs and booby traps; how to escape from a riot; how to deal with frostbite and heat exhaustion; how to avoid trouble in sex, love and war; and how cope if you have had a traumatic experience. The author conveys this wealth of practical, sensible advice in a very direct and personal way. In addition, readers hear the voices of many well-known journalists who share their experiences and advice in a very direct and personal way. This book is an enjoyable read as well as a true survival manual which can be enjoyed by both men and women (usually ignored by the ‘boys’ own’ market) and by all ages especially travellers venturing away from home or to extreme destinations for the first time.

Medical information has been vetted by Médecins Sans Frontières, one of the world’s leading medical charities which specializes in warzones and other trouble spots.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8oCZI48eHsY

The tap’s run dry, the supermarkets have been ransacked, the power is off and the low rumble of tanks can be heard in the distance. The unprepared who refused to believe that such a thing could happen here will live as wretched refugees—if they live at all. But for the prepared—for the city survivors—life will go on. America’s leading survival author debunks the myth that the only way to survive is to stock a retreat in the mountains. He tells urban dwellers how to find water; trap and butcher game; preserve food; position a retreat for maximum safety; avoid troops; and barter with other survivors. You’ll learn which weapons are absolute necessities and which aren’t worth having, and confront the all-important topic of survival nursing care. Ragnar gives you the solid information you will need to make it if the worst-case scenario becomes a reality.

Genre: Children

Short Stories From Hogwarts of Power, Politics and Pesky Poltergeists: Pottermore PresentsPottermore archives: short readsHarry Potter

These stories of power, politics and pesky poltergeists give you a glimpse into the darker side of the wizarding world, revealing the ruthless roots of Professor Umbridge, the lowdown on the Ministers for Magic and the history of the wizarding prison Azkaban. You will also delve deeper into Horace Slughorn’s early years as Potions master at Hogwarts – and his acquaintance with one Tom Marvolo Riddle.

Genre: Children

Short Stories From Hogwarts of Heroism, Hardship and Dangerous Hobbies: Pottermore PresentsPottermore archives: short readsHarry Potter

These stories of heroism, hardship and dangerous hobbies profile two of the Harry Potter stories’ most courageous and iconic characters: Minerva McGonagall and Remus Lupin. J.K. Rowling also gives us a peek behind the closed curtains of Sybill Trelawney’s life, and you’ll encounter the reckless, magical-beast-loving Silvanus Kettleburn along the way.