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Self 23 book

Genre: Prose

Having become free, you will see fetters of others. Trying to remove these fetters, you will create hatred. Fetters can be broken only by those realized them.

Truly free is reasonable, yet not clever.

Truly free is innocent, yet not a child.

Truly free is capable to trust, but himself.

Truly free has no dreams.

Truly free is free to aid sleeping ones awake.

Such is the truly free one.

Of the many problems we face today, some are natural calamities and must be accepted and faced with equanimity. Others, however, are of our own making, created by misunderstanding, and can be corrected. One such type arises from the conflict of ideologies, political or religious, when people fight each other for petty ends, losing sight of the basic humanity that binds us all together as a single human family. We must remember that the different religions, ideologies, and political systems of the world are meant for human beings to achieve happiness. We must not lose sight of this fundamental goal and at no time should we place means above ends; the supremacy of humanity over matter and ideology must always be maintained.

With kind permission of His Holiness the Dalai Lama, Dharamsala.

From Second Dharma Celebration, November 5th-8th 1982, New Delhi, India.

Translated by Alex Berzin, clarified by Lama Zopa Rinpoche, edited by Nicholas Ribush.

First published by Tushita Mahayana Meditation Centre, New Delhi, 1982

As the twentieth century draws to a close, we find that the world has grown smaller and the world's people have become almost one community. Political and military alliances have created large multinational groups, industry and international trade have produced a global economy, and worldwide communications are eliminating ancient barriers of distance, language and race. We are also being drawn together by the grave problems we face: overpopulation, dwindling natural resources, and an environmental crisis that threatens our air, water, and trees, along with the vast number of beautiful life forms that are the very foundation of existence on this small planet we share.

Carlos Castaneda was a graduate student in anthropology at the University of California, Los Angeles, gathering information on various medicinal herbs used by the Indians in Sonora, Mexico, when he met the old Yaqui Indian, Don Juan. The Teachings of Don Juan, his first book, is the story of the first period the two men spent together as master and pupil. This was followed by the other volumes in the series, A Separate Reality, Journey to Ixtlan, Tales of Power, The Second Ring of Power and The Eagle's Gift, all of which are published in Arkana. He also wrote the Art of Dreaming (1993).

Carlos Castaneda died in 1998. In its obituary for him the Guardian wrote 'It is hard to find a New Age celebrity who won't admit to having been influenced by Castaneda's powerful prose and paradigm-busting philosophy… Few critics would deny author Joyce Carol Oates's assessment of his books as «remarkable works of art»'

The biography of the Englishwoman who has become a world-renowned spiritual leader and a champion of the right of women to achieve spiritual enlightenment. Following Tenzin Palmo's life from England to India, including her seclusion in a remote cave for 12 years, leading to her decision to found a convent to revive the Togdenma lineage.

It sounds like a legend out of medieval Tibet: the ascetic who leaves home to join the Buddhist order, then spends 12 years in a cave, 15 hours a day in a meditation box. This is no legend, but you could call Tenzin Palmo legendary in her single-minded pursuit of higher realizations. From the East End of London to halfway up the Himalayas, she is now back in society, attempting to pull medieval Tibetan Buddhism into the modern era--women's rights and all. As biographer Vickie Mackenzie says by way of background, a group of elite women practitioners called "Togdemnas" still existed just decades ago. Tenzin Palmo, having studied with her male counterparts, is now canvassing the planet, welcoming women into full participation in Tibetan Buddhism and building support for an academy of Togdemnas that she plans to establish in the Himalayas. Mackenzie helps raise awareness for women's roles in Tibetan Buddhism by going into some detail about obstacles still faced by women as well as heroines who have overcome those obstacles, such as Yeshe Tsogyel (Sky Dancer) and Machig Lapdron, a mother who started her own lineage. If Mackenzie has it her way, it won't be long before Tenzin Palmo joins that list of heroines. ––

Amazon.com Review

For one more life I write with feather - let's voice keep ringing in the ether.

The Maker gave a Blade of Fire to fight in souls and in wire,

To sing a Message to mankind and help become them man of mind.

Let courage, honor, joy and truth awaken souls, who are sooth,

So with the Hope in divine Light they'll purify the world of blight.

The mix of times is on threshold, and pure spirits, who are bold,

Will have a chance for wisdom's feast, and learn that death does not exist.

Advice was given, hints were made, let's inner fire never fade -

But help one see what's wrong and main, for we are coming once again …

SUMMARY: “In the beginner’s mind there are many possibilities, but in the expert’s there are few.” So begins this most beloved of all American Zen books. Seldom has such a small handful of words provided a teaching as rich as has this famous opening line of Shunryu Suzuki’s classic. In a single stroke, the simple sentence cuts through the pervasive tendency students have of getting so close to Zen as to completely miss what it’s all about. An instant teaching on the first page. And that’s just the beginning. In the thirty years since its original publication, Zen Mind, Beginner’s Mind has become one of the great modern Zen classics, much beloved, much re-read, and much recommended as the best first book to read on Zen. Suzuki Roshi presents the basics — from the details of posture and breathing in zazen to the perception of nonduality — in a way that is not only remarkably clear, but that also resonates with the joy of insight from the first to the last page. It’s a book to come back to time and time again as an inspiration to practice.

Laugh aloud even as you look at life anew with these stories from the bestselling author of

In 108 brief stories with titles like “The Bad Elephant,” “Girlfriend Power,” and “The Happiness License,” Ajahn Brahm offers up more timeless wisdom that will speak to people from all walks of life. Drawing from his own experiences, stories shared by his students, and old chestnuts that he delivers with a fresh twist, Ajahn Brahm shows he knows his way around the humorous parable, delighting even as he surprises us with unexpected depth and inspiration.

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‘With a healthy dose of scepticism and humour, Dan Harris skilfully demystifies meditation, reminding us all that a healthy and happy mind is not only essential for our own sanity, but also for those around us. More importantly, he provides a compelling invitation to move beyond words, from the idea to the experience. A wonderful book and excellent advice.’ Andy Puddicombe, founder of Headspace

‘With startling, provocative, and often very funny candour, Dan Harris tells the story of why he urgently needed to tame the strident voice in his head, and how he did it. His argument for the power of mindfulness–which he bases both on cutting-edge science and his own hard-won experience–will convince even the most sceptical reader of meditation’s potential.’ Gretchen Rubin, author of

‘In , Dan Harris describes in fascinating detail the stresses of working as a news correspondent and the relief he has found through the practice of meditation. This is an extremely brave, funny, and insightful book. Every ambitious person should read it.’ Sam Harris, author of

‘A compellingly honest, delightfully interesting, and at times heartwarming story of one highly intelligent man’s life-changing journey toward a deeper understanding of what makes us our very best selves.’ Chade-Meng Tan, author of

‘Too many mainstreamers write books about meditation and miss the point—productivity, efficiency, and getting an edge mean nothing without compassion. But this brilliant, humble, funny story shows how one man found a way to navigate the nonstop stresses and demands on modern life and back to humanity by finally learning to sit around and do nothing.’ Colin Beavan, author of

‘A spiritual adventure from a master storyteller. Mindfulness can make you happier. Read this to find out how.’ George Stephanopoulos

‘The science supporting the health benefits of meditation continues to grow as does the number of Americans who count themselves as practitioners but, it took reading to make me actually want to give it a try. Dan Harris takes the mystical mantle off meditation and shows how easy it can be to incorporate into your life. Painfully candid, outrageously funny, and definitely enlightening, Harris’s book left me feeling much more than 10% happier.‘ Richard E. Besser, M.D.—Chief Health and Medical Editor, ABC News

‘Part-science, part-memoir, and part self-help, Harris outlines specific ways he learned to, well, chill the f**k out.’

Researcher and thought leader Dr. Brene Brown offers a powerful new vision in Daring Greatly that encourages us to embrace vulnerability and imperfection, to live wholeheartedly and courageously. 'It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; . . . who at best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly' -Theodore Roosevelt Every time we are introduced to someone new, try to be creative, or start a difficult conversation, we take a risk. We feel uncertain and exposed. We feel vulnerable. Most of us try to fight those feelings - we strive to appear perfect.

What does everyone in the modern world need to know? Renowned psychologist Jordan B. Peterson’s answer to this most difficult of questions uniquely combines the hard-won truths of ancient tradition with the stunning revelations of cutting-edge scientific research. Humorous, surprising, and informative, Dr. Peterson tells us why skateboarding boys and girls must be left alone, what terrible fate awaits those who criticize too easily, and why you should always pet a cat when you meet one on the street. What does the nervous system of the lowly lobster have to tell us about standing up straight (with our shoulders back) and about success in life? Why did ancient Egyptians worship the capacity to pay careful attention as the highest of gods? What dreadful paths do people tread when they become resentful, arrogant, and vengeful? Dr. Peterson journeys broadly, discussing discipline, freedom, adventure, and responsibility, distilling the world’s wisdom into 12 practical and profound rules for life. 12 Rules for Life shatters the modern commonplaces of science, faith, and human nature while transforming and ennobling the mind and spirit of its listeners.